Who won the Logic Analyzer Wars?

We learned recently that Tektronix has discontinued the last of its logic analyzer family. Sigh….Here at FuturePlus Systems we walked the careful balance between the two Whales, Tektronix and HP/Agilent/Keysight. Mostly siding with the later and only crossing over to the ‘dark side’ at the customer’s request. I remember vividly visiting the impressive Beaverton Tektronix campus, hat in hand touting our superior interposers and hardware skills looking for the elusive key to the Tektronix software development environment so we could sell into that market. Once we started down the Tektronix path we had to carefully dodge the wrath of our best friend Agilent. Like the old Girl Scout song I sang as a child “make new friends but keep the old….one is silver and the other gold”. Tektronix was Silver but Agilent was clearly Gold. The wars started in the early 2000’s with one large vendor in particular pitting the two giants against each other. It was brutal with every little technical spec thrown back in our faces as the One Large Vendor led us into the ring to chew each other to death. As it turns out the One Large Vendor had made a costly mistake…..they never thought that if they pushed too hard one vendor would walk. As it turned out one of them did and the remaining Whale charged big and delivered what ever they wanted. The One Large Vendor was able to entice the other Whale back into service a few years later and the wars heated up again around 2010. Then the Logic Analyzer business began a slow and steady decline. The reasons were...

LPDDR4 to LPDDR4X: What is the difference?

Hello Memory Enthusiasts!  Please see here a guest post by the distinguished Patrick Moran  Thanks Pat for allowing the repost! LPDDR4 was introduced in 2014 about two years after LPDDR3. This was probably the fastest transition for a new generation memory ever in JEDEC history. New products and features being introduced into the mobile ecosystem requiring faster and lower power memory propelled the fast development. LPDDR4 succeeded in increasing maximum data rates from 1866 Mbps to 3200 Mbps. But active power results for initial products were disappointing since operating voltage was reduced by only 7%. The industry responded with LPDDR4X early in 2017. The ‘X’ stands for ‘eXtra’ or ‘eXtended’. It headlined lower I/O voltage to save system power and new features to kick the data rate from 3200 to 4266 Mbps. Today it has replaced the original LPDDR4 for new designs (LPDDR4 remains available for legacy systems.) Think of LPDDR4X as LPDDR4 done right. What makes a good LP DRAM and where did LPDDR4 come up short? Two things really – active power and standby power. Maximum active power occurs when the mobile device is operating at full speed, for example playing an action game, and includes memory device power and the power the system uses to operate the memory. An aggressive goal for a new generation of LP DRAM might be the same power at its full speed for the new generation LP DRAM. For example, a LPDDR4 at its max speed of 3200 Mbps might consume the same power as a LPDDR3 operating at its max speed of 1600 Mbps. The least aggressive goal would be that...
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